Declawing Surgery Wichita KS

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Declawing Surgery. You will find informative articles about Declawing Surgery, including "Cat Declaw Surgery: A MyPetED Vet on Declawing a Cat, Post-Surgery Care" and "Declawing Cats; MyPetED Veterinarian on Insights & Alternatives". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Wichita, KS that can help answer your questions about Declawing Surgery.

Skaer Veterinary Clinic
(316) 243-9003
404 S Edgemoor St Building 100
Wichita, KS
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Flea Control, Animal Microchipping, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Vaccinations

Countryside Pet Clinic
(316) 778-0932
1936 N Andover Rd
Andover, KS
Promotion
Call today to schedule an appointment!
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Microchipping, Declawing, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Medical Specialties, Veterinary Surgery

Air Capital Veterinary Clinic
(316) 267-1094
419 S Hydraulic St
Wichita, KS

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Animal Health Center of Wichita
(316) 267-4738
2930 E. Harry St.
Wichita, KS
Services
wellness, surgery, dentistry, nutrition, xrays
Hours
M-F 7:30-5:30, Saturday 1-4

College Hill Animal Hospital
(316) 618-8881
244 N Hillside St
Wichita, KS

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Willowbend Animal Hospital
(316) 444-0974
7606 East 37th Street N
Wichita, KS
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Flea Control, Animal Microchipping, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Vaccinations

Andover Veterinary Clinic & Boarding Kennel
(316) 665-6872
517 W Central Ave
Andover, KS
Promotion
All new clients receive a $25 exam fee on their first pet. Savings of $20!
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Grooming, Animal Microchipping, Declawing, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Surgery

Veterinary Emergency & Specialty Hospital of Wichita
(316) 262-5321
727 S Washington St
Wichita, KS

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Indian Hills Animal Clinic
(316) 942-3900
3223 W 13th St N
Wichita, KS

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Seneca Veterinary Clinic
(316) 262-1239
435 N Seneca St
Wichita, KS

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Cat Declaw Surgery: A MyPetED Vet on Declawing a Cat, Post-Surgery Care

By Ernest Ward, DVM

What’s the procedure to declaw a cat?MyPetEd Image: Cat Declaw Procedure

  • Your veterinarian or a specialist declaws a cat by surgically removing (onychectomy) the entire nail and nail bed of the front claws using a scalpel or a CO2 laser. Sometimes the entire 3rd phalanx is removed.
  • The cat is under general anesthesia during the procedure.
  • The surgeon closes the incision sites using surgical skin adhesive or absorbable sutures.
  • The cat is often hospitalized for 1-2 nights for initial recovery, with oral antibiotics and/or pain medication prescribed for 5-7 days after surgery.
  • Usually the cat is "back to normal" within 7-14 days.

What are some cat-declaw guidelines to help my pet recover from surgery?

Let’s start with the DON’T’s:

  • NEVER USE CLUMPING LITTER during the recovery period. Small litter granules cause pain or infection and delaying healing.
  • DON’T LET YOUR CAT JUMP DOWN from furniture or countertops if at all possible.
  • NEVER USE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE TO TREAT THE WOUND.
  • NEVER TRY CLEANING THE PAWS OR USE MEDICAL CREAMS without consulting a veterinarian.
  • NEVER WAIT to call your veterinarian if the surgical sites are bleeding continuously.

Here are a number of DO’s:

  • Litter Box: For the first 5-7 days, replace your cat’s usual litter with a specially formulated dust-free, pelleted litter or shredded paper strips. If your cat doesn’t like using the paper strips, try adding ¼-cup of regular clay litter with its dust shaken out.
  • Exercise: Try to stop your cat from jumping down as much as possible, since the surgical sites can be injured when your cat lands on its front paws. Your cat may have no problem jumping up with its back legs, but if your cat’s on the countertop or furniture, help it down gently.
  • Bleeding: During recovery, your cat may break open one of its incisions and release a few drops of blood. The blood should clot rapidly and form a small scab that will heal.

When should I call my veterinarian as my pet recovers from a cat declaw?MyPetED Image: Cat declaw guidelines

Call your veterinary clinic immediately if you see these problems:

  • Swollen feet
  • Bleeding feet (bleeding frequently and profusely)
  • A reluctance to walk after 4-5 days at home
  • Any in your cat's overall health, behavior or eating habits

It’s always best to call if you’re anxious or concerned about your cat’s healing process.

Besides the surgery itself, are there any negative aspects to having a cat declawed?

  • Once your ...

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Declawing Cats; MyPetED Veterinarian on Insights & Alternatives

By Debra Horwitz, DVM, Diplomate ACVB and Gary Landsberg, DVM, Diplomate ACVB

What does “declawing a cat” mean? MyPetED offers alternatives to declawing cats.

  • It’s the surgical removal of the toenail (claw) and the portion of bone from which it grows.
  • In most cases, only the front paws are declawed.
  • As a surgical procedure, it requires a general anesthesia and appropriate and sufficient pain management throughout the recovery procedure.

Should I get my indoor cat declawed?

  • Declawing a cat merely because it will be staying indoors or because it might one day cause damage with its claws is difficult, if not impossible, to justify.
  • It’s a painful procedure that may affect the cat's mobility during the post-operative recovery period; therefore it should not be considered a routine or preventive surgery.
  • Most cats can be prevented from doing damage if you raise your cat with booby traps around areas you don’t want damaged.
  • Plus, regular nail trimming and commercially available plastic nail caps can also be useful to minimize damage to furniture.
  • In some cases, scratching is a form of marking behavior due to anxiety. You could eliminate the scratching if you resolve the anxiety.

My cat is causing unacceptable damage. In this situation, is declawing acceptable?

In some homes, the issue comes down to removing the cat from the home or having it declawed.

  • In one study, it was estimated that as many as 50% of cat owners who declawed their cats would not have otherwise kept their cat.
  • When a family member suffers from an immunosuppressive disease or a disease such as diabetes, scratches can be devastating.
  • It might also be argued that the short term pain and discomfort of declawing (which can be minimized with pain medications) may be preferable to a life of constant confinement and excessive (and unsuccessful) attempts at punishment.
  • Still, declawing is considered immoral or even illegal in some jurisdictions and in some countries. 

What is the effect of declawing on the cat?

In the past few years, a number of behaviorists, pet psychologists and epidemiologists have studied the effects of declawing on the cat, the owner, and the cat-owner relationship. Here are some of the results:

  • At least 10 scientific studies have examined the consequences of declawing on the pet and on the pet-owner relationship. These studies show that declawing does not alter the cat's behavior.
  • Declawed cats are not at greater risk of getting bitten or injured in catfights. Owners of declawed cats report a higher number of good behaviors than the owners of clawed cats.
  • House-soiling problems appear to be equally common in cats that have been declawed and those that have not.

To decrease the need for multiple anesthetics, declawing is often performed at the time of surgical sterilization.MyPetED Image: Surgical removal of claws or

  • It generally takes a few days or weeks for complete healing, after which time the cat can walk, climb, knead and scratch comfortably.
  • Anecdotal...

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