Dental Care for Dogs Prescott AZ

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VCA Thumb Butte Animal Hospital
(928) 583-7415
1441 West Gurley Street
Prescott, AZ
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Animal Boarding, Animal Daycare, Animal Flea Control, Animal Grooming, Animal Microchipping, Small Animal Vet, Spaying/Neutering, Veterinarians, Veterinary Cropping, Veterinary Dentistry, Veterinary Docking, Veterinary Euthanasia, Veterinary Medical Specialties, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Vaccinations

Granite Mountain Veterinary
(928) 771-1340
3073 Willow Creek Rd
Prescott, AZ

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Metcalf, Todd, DVM - Harmony Veterinary Care
(928) 445-4581
1205 White Spar Rd
Prescott, AZ

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Redmon, Jennifer, Dvm - Prescott Valley Pet Clinic
(928) 772-6069
9501 E Lorna Ln
Prescott Valley, AZ

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Chino Valley Animal Hospital
(888) 868-9094
3601 N State Route 89
Chino Valley, AZ

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Metcalf, Todd L, Dvm - Harmony Veterinary Care
(928) 445-7499
832 Hope St
Prescott, AZ

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Animal Care Clinic-Prescott Pc
(928) 445-5442
803 E Sheldon St
Prescott, AZ

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Morris, Nita, Dvm - Bradshaw Mountain Animal Hosp
(928) 772-7775
6227 E 2nd St
Prescott Valley, AZ

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Bradshaw Mountain Animal Hosp
(928) 772-7775
6227 E 2nd St
Prescott Valley, AZ

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Killian, Miles, Dvm - Chino Valley Animal Hospital
(928) 636-4382
3601 N State Route 89
Chino Valley, AZ

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Dog Dental Disease: MyPetED Veterinarian on Dog Dental Problems, Care

By Ernest Ward, DVM

Are dog dental problems common?

MyPetED image: Left untreated, dog dental disease spreads deep into the tooth socket, destroying the bone. Ultimately, the tooth loosens and falls out.

  • Dog dental problems are among the most common medical conditions seen by veterinarians.
  • Over 68% of all dogs over 3 have some form of periodontal or dental disease.
  • Few pets show obvious signs of dental disease until it becomes a painful condition. It pays to prevent dental problems in the first place.

How do dog dental problems start?

  • It begins with plaque on the teeth, which leads to periodontal disease; a term used to describe inflammation or infection of the tissues surrounding the tooth.
  • If you don’t brush your dog’s teeth , tartar and calculus accumulate on the teeth, causing gum recession around the base of the tooth.
  • Infection soon follows and the gums recede further, exposing sensitive unprotected tooth root surfaces and the bony tooth sockets
  • Left untreated, the infection spreads deep into the tooth socket, destroying the bone. Ultimately, the tooth loosens and falls out.

How does plaque form, and why is it a problem?

  • The mouth is home to thousands of bacteria. As these bacteria multiply on the surfaces of the tooth, they form an invisible layer called plaque. Some of this plaque is removed naturally by the dog's tongue and chewing habits.
  • If allowed to remain on the tooth surface, the plaque thickens and progresses as tartar, which accumulates above and below the gumline and presses on the gums, causing inflammation called gingivitis.
  • As the oral infection progresses, the bacteria can be absorbed into the blood stream and be carried to other organs. "Bad teeth" can cause infections in the heart valves (endocarditis), kidneys and/or liver.

Can tartar be prevented?MyPetED image: Special chews and treats can help prevent detnal disease.

  • Yes, you can prevent tartar build-up through regular home care, particularly tooth brushing with toothpaste designed to be swallowed.
  • Special dog chew toys and treats may help reduce or delay tartar build-up.
  • Some dental diets mechanically assist in removing plaque.

Will feeding dry food remove tartar?

Pet food manufacturers offer dental diets that can help reduce plaque and tartar in your pet. Once tartar has formed, it's necessary to remove it through professional scaling and polishing under general anesthesia.

What is involved with a routine dental cleaning?

  • Anesthesia is used so the pet won't move during the procedure. Therefore, your veterinarian will perform pre-anesthetic blood tests to ensure that kidney and liver function are satisfactory for anesthesia.
  • Sometimes antibiotic treatment is started before the periodontal therapy is performed. Your veterinarian will discuss the specific pre-dental recommendations for your pet.
  • Once your dog is anesthetized, your vet thoroughly examines the mouth, noting tooth alignment and any tartar present. If periodontal disease is severe, it may not be possible to save badly affected teeth, which may need to be extracted.
  • Next,the vet performs tooth scaling to remove all traces of...

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