Dog Behavior Training Vancouver WA

See below for dog trainers that provide dog behavior training in Vancouver and gain access to dog obedience training and training for separation anxiety, chewing problems, and puppy biting, along with dog bite prevention, leash training, puppy crate training, dog boundary training, and dog clicker training, as well as advice and content on handling dog barking.

Peace Love & Paws
(503) 753-1200
Portland, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Errand Service, House Sitting, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Behavior Modification, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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DogMa Pet Care, ABCDT
(503) 816-5009
Portland, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, House Sitting, Pet Transportation, Behavior Modification, Errand Service, Dog Training, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Overnight Pet Boarding, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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SafeJourney Pet Sitting
(503) 209-0177
Portland, OR
Services
Specialty Pet Products, Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Pet Transportation, Pooper Scooper Service, House Sitting, Behavior Modification, Doggie Day Care, Dog Training, Errand Service, Grooming, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Overnight Pet Boarding, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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GRF Petsitting & Dogwalking
(503) 407-0280
Beaverton, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Pooper Scooper Service, House Sitting, Behavior Modification, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Grooming, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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K9 Conversation
(360) 910-6411
Vancouver, WA
Services
Behavioral Consultation, Private Lessons, Private Training
Membership Organizations
The Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT)

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Pet Professionals, Inc.
(503) 261-7138
Portland, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Pet Transportation, House Sitting, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Behavior Modification, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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Reigning Pets NW
(503) 799-2461
Portland, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Behavior Modification, Dog Training, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

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Home Alone Professional Pet Care, LLC
(503) 644-2880
Beaverton, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Pet Transportation, Pooper Scooper Service, Behavior Modification, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

Data Provided By:
Devine Pet Care Oregon
(503) 504-1101
Hillsboro, OR
Services
Mail/Newspaper Retrieval, Pet Transportation, House Sitting, Errand Service, Behavior Modification, Alternating Lights/Curtains, Dog Training, Overnight Sitting, Daily Dog Walks
Membership Organizations
Pet Sitters International

Data Provided By:
Dog Days
(360) 608-0867
Vancouver, WA
Services
Aggression, Akc Obedience, Behavioral Consultation, Cgc Training, Clicker Training, Fun Games, Group Training, Private Training, Rally
Membership Organizations
The Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT)

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Aggressive Dog Behavior, Cat Behavior: MyPetED Veterinarians Offer Advice

By Debra Horwitz, DVM, Diplomate ACVB and Gary Landsberg, DVM, Diplomate ACVB.

Why do aggressive pet behaviors happen?MyPetED advises: Call your veterinarian for professional guidance on aggressive dog behaviors.

Aggression as a form of pet communication can have several, combined motivations, such as dominance, conflict, fear, protecting their babies or owners, pain, play or medical conditions. Dogs and cats use aggressive displays, threats and attacks to:

  • Resolve competitive disputes over resources (territory, food),
  • Increase their reproductive potential, or
  • Escape threatening situations.

Are aggressive dog and cat behaviors normal?

They may be “normal,” but they’re dangerous and unacceptable.

  • It’s estimated that pets cause 2 to 5 million human bite wounds across North America each year.
  • Most people are bitten by animals they own or that are familiar to them.
  • Human safety must always be a primary consideration when facing pet aggression!

Some aggression may be abnormal when the pet is excessively anxious or unable to control its response. Causes include genetics, insufficient socialization, insufficient maternal care, or exposure to excessively fearful events, particularly during early development.

How do aggressive dogs communicate behaviors?

  • First, a dog establishes eye contact with the other dog. Prolonged eye contact may be considered a threat.
  • If the dog believes the intrusion is continuing, the dog may escalate the threat by exposing the teeth and snarling, with or without growling.
  • Ear position can also give clues. A subordinate dog usually lowers the ears and a fearful dog has them pressed tight to the head. An assertive dog has ears erect.
  • Dogs also attempt to change their body position. Some try to look "bigger" by raising the hair along the neck and back, raising the tail high and slowly wagging its tail. Other dogs attempt to look "smaller" by crouching down, tucking the tail between the legs and even rolling over.
  • These postures can result in a standoff, a decrease or an increase in the aggression.

What does aggressive cat behavior look like?MyPetED recommends talking with your veterinarian for professional help with aggressive behavior in cats.

  • Often the first sign is pupil dilation (eyes) and rapid side-to-side tail movements. This may be accompanied by putting the ears back and hissing or growling.
  • The cat may "swipe" at the intruder with a front paw, either with the claws sheathed or exposed.
  • Sometimes the cat gathers its legs under itself and appears ready to pounce. If the intruder is not too close, or begins to leave, the aggressive encounter may end.
  • Cats frequently try to enhance their size and ferocity to make the threat more menacing. They do this by turning sideways to the intruder, arching their back, holding the tail upright or straight down, and having their fur stand up. They may hiss, growl and yowl at the same time.
  • Or, a cat may crouch down, tail switching back and forth, with the ears tight against the head, again with accompanying vocalization. A cat anticipating a fight may roll onto its back with claw...

Click here to read the rest of this article from MyPetED

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